About your Search

20121112
20121120
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
goodness we have more natural gas than the rest of the world combined and it's driven by the technological improvements and a five or ten year technological lead than the countries we're competing with. it's interesting, paul, if you look the at the last three or four years, now what industry has created more than any other industry in the united states. >> paul: the electric car industry, steve? (laughter) >> no, not that one. oil and gas and the thing that's so amazing, the president is doing almost everything he can to try to hold this back with regulations and with not allowi allowing permitting most of the oil and gas development is going out on private land and where the president has to get with the program because we could literally create millions more jobs if we get this story right. >> paul: jim, the consequences here economically are big for downstream production, things like manufacturing. >> right. >> that had left the, i talked to one ceo, dow chemical, who had planned years ago never to build another plant in the united states and now making a 4 billion dollar bet on manuf
. on november 24th, let's get out and shop small. but proven technologies allow natural gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. >>> okay. so in the wake of a high profile resignation of david petraeus and the new allegations surrounding john allen in afghanistan, there are lots of new questions being asked about how the scandal could affect the future of the cia and the covert community. joining me with insight is former cia operative who is also the author of a new spy novel. let's talk about this, michael, because someone who has close tabs to the espionage community and this is playing out basically better than fiction, as we watch the details come out about this, what are people inside of
it comes to the technology that they were using to try to evade the surveillance state that they built. it's amazing. >> the other thing i find amazing is i remember going through the u.s. treasury in the height of the financial crisis, and back then, you had officials who were scribbling down important facts and figures on scrap paper because that was one of the few things they were able to legally throw away and get rid of. and if you go around other branches of the u.s. government today, people are intensely aware of the risks of e-mails being kept. if you go and talk to private sector banks, nobody working on a bank trading floor these days can possibly not be aware of the risks of tracking thoughts and e-mails. and yet somehow the military just seems not to have noticed this. it is very, very striking. >> there's one other dedataidei this "journal" story, kelley had second thoughts. and people said they made the request, quote, she was worried about the personal information being provided to investigators. >> like the diplomatic license plates. >> talk about the horse after it's left
much rather power this economy with the energy technologies that won't be viable for 30, 40 years from now as opposed to driving the economy with what's viable today. >> phil, this analysis said we could be oil exporters within the next 20 years or some what kind of an impact would that have on our economy as a whole? >> well i think it is going to give us a new form of income. it will lower our trade deficit. we were always concerned about, you know, sending all our money to china for goods and the trade deficit with china, it is not fair. guess what? we're going to be in a distinct advantage over china, not only from a trade standpoint because we're going to be able to provide them with energy they need but also because we're going to be able to attract manufacturing jobs here to the united states. why? because we're going to have the reliable, low-priced energy source for years to come. that's going to bring manufacturing back to the u.s. that will bring factories and jobs. this is historic. i'm euphoric. i've seen it coming for some time. i'm glad the international energy agency is
trained in science, technology, those kinds of things. i think there are exciting opportunities. i think immigration reform has a possibility. >> on competitiveness across the globe, are corporate tax rates too high in america? >> i think they should be brought down but that has got to be part of a bigger deal. we can't just bring them down and not pay for them. it will be closing the subsidies whether it's the oil subsidy, whether it's looking at some of the other ones. so if we could get some grand deal and i think it could happen, where businesses are onboard. not everyone will like it but where you bring the business rates down in exchange for taking those levels on the bush tax cuts for people making over $250,000, clothing subsidies and loopholes and then adding in the spending cuts, that's how we do it and put the business community onboard in part by making these reductions in the corporate tax rate. >> senator klobuchar, congratulations on everything. >> congratulations. good luck. >> okay. >> up next, a big development in u.s. oil production with potentially major implications
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)